public policy (noun): government policies that affect the whole population

Public policy is not something everyone thinks about but is very important in how our society is managed. The Center for Civic Education defines specific attributes of public policy that help to expand on the above basic definition:

  • Policy is made in response to some sort of issue or problem that requires attention. Policy is what the government chooses to do (actual) or not do (implied) about a particular issue or problem.
  • Policy might take the form of law, or regulation, or the set of all the laws and regulations that govern a particular issue or problem.
  • Policy is made on behalf of the “public.”
  • Policy is oriented toward a goal or desired state, such as the solution of a problem.
  • Policy is ultimately made by governments, even if the ideas come from outside government or through the interaction of government and the public.
  • Policymaking is part of an ongoing process that does not always have a clear beginning or end, since decisions about who will benefit from policies and who will bear any burden resulting from the policy are continually reassessed, revisited and revised.

You can clearly see that a key ingredient for good public policy is the “public” part. That is you and me. When we vote, we are making a choice of individuals we trust to work through the policy process, often referred to as sausage making, with our best interests in mind.

But there are additional ways we can participate. When there is a problem or issue that needs to be addressed, do you reach out to policy makers and let them know how you feel? What you believe is the right thing to do? Do you send a letter/note, make a call or attend a town hall meeting to share your support or opposition?

These are a variety of ways that you can communicate effectively with those in positions to shape public policy, and they want to hear from you. This is why the Marquette County Ambassadors have focused, for decades, on building strong relationships with our elected officials and engaging in policy creation and debate of issues affecting our community.

The Marquette County Ambassadors are a privately funded group of business, education, community and government leaders from across Marquette County whose mission it is to “promote and foster economic vitality throughout Marquette County and the Upper Peninsula, to carry the story of the Marquette County area to others, and salute those who deserve recognition.”

For decades the Marquette County Ambassadors have made trips to Lansing to meet with legislators and state department personnel. The purpose of the trip is threefold: to inform our legislators of relevant issues affecting Marquette County and the Upper Peninsula, to hear their perspectives on activities related to state government, and to share with them our position on critical issues related to the Upper Peninsula. This year we were proud to have partners from Baraga and Dickinson counties join us.

The Ambassadors researched and produced position papers in four major areas:

  • Economic Development
  • Education
  • Local Government
  • Infrastructure

Many, if not all, of the issues raised or initiatives supported are not specific to Marquette County, but rather the Upper Peninsula as a whole. Regional cooperation continues to play a vital role in the betterment of the Upper Peninsula and U.P. communities have a long history of working together. Our legislators appreciate the regional collaboration and single voice on issues they are pursuing.

So at the end of the day, if we want public policy to truly address the needs and concerns of the public, then we “the public” need to engage. For issues and legislation we are watching, hop on to our website at www.marquette.org.

Authored By: Amy Clickner, CEcD, CFRM, Chief Executive Officer, Lake Superior Community Partnership. Amy is a Member at Large on MEDA’s Board of Directors.

 

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MEDA’s 2015 President – Intro, Focus Areas of Economic Development for the Year

MEDA Members,Wood, Kara

It is a pleasure to serve you as the 2015 MEDA Board of Directors President. After many years of membership in MEDA and participation on the Board, it is an honor to represent my colleagues in economic development across the state.

Thank you to our 2014 President, Ara Topouzian, for his leadership over the past year. MEDA has been strengthened by his commitment and dedication. Fortunately, Ara will continue as a member of the Board. The Board officers this year include Vice President Jennifer Owens, Treasurer Michelle Aniol, and Secretary Amy Clickner.  Members at Large include Luke Bonner, and newly elected Stephanie Carroll, Monique Holliday-Bettie and Karl Dorshimer. Mark Morante continues to serve in an Ex Officio role. We have exceptional staff including Executive Director John Avery, Administrative Manager Cassandra Jorae, and Administrative Assistant Diana Gorvokovic.

MEDA’s membership has remained strong the past several years, in spite of the slowed economy. This is evidence of the hard work of our committees and the value of a MEDA membership. I encourage you to invite others to join. The strength in our organization relies heavily on the strength of committee participation.

An important part of MEDA’s value proposition is our 2015 program offerings which will combine informational content with the opportunity to network with your fellow ED professionals.

According to Governor Snyder, workforce development is the next key area for further improving Michigan’s business climate. Specifically, more career tech training for manufacturing and skilled trades jobs. Expanding programs like the Michigan Advanced Technician Training program and the Advanced Manufacturing Partnership. Continuous improvement in all areas of economic development programming and more work with local partners and the business community.

MEDA recognizes the importance of workforce supply and education/training programs. Our state continues to be recognized for our skilled workforce and outstanding educational institutions. However, there is always room for improvement. Your input and support will be needed as the Board works to identify opportunities to support the advancement of workforce availability and worker skill levels throughout the state.

Other areas that MEDA will explore with programming are a direct result of what is happening in the state’s economy including additional growth in venture capital investments, more crowdfunding, higher levels of investment interest in Michigan as Detroit emerges from bankruptcy, manufacturers predicting another year of steady growth, but talent continuing to be a leading concern and continued work toward efficient regionalism.

Your participation is critical to the success of this organization. Email meda@medaweb.org and join a committee today!

Sincerely,

Authored by: Kara L. Wood, Economic Development Director, City of Grand Rapids. Kara is MEDA’s 2015 Board President.