Holland Michigan: Beyond the MEDA Annual Meeting

holland tulips In January when the committee began planning for the MEDA Annual Meeting, our common goal was to ensure a meeting platform that fostered connection and relationship building. It was my pleasure to chair a committee with so many engaged and hard-working members who understand that successful economic development professionals seek peer connections and industry leaders to learn valuable information on how to build a strong organization and community. This conference will allow you to Connect with other economic development leaders from throughout the state.

Our community is excited to host this conference in Holland; a city known for its tulips, state and county parks, and voted the #1 small city to start a business by Wallethub.com two years in a row. As the conference finishes around noon on Friday, I would invite you to extend your stay through weekend. Go from economic development professional to tourist in one of the best beach towns in the country. Stay through the weekend and bring your family to enjoy:

  • Vibrant arts and culture scene

Musicians, caricature artists, face painters, jugglers, magicians and even aerial acrobats are all a part of the street performer series each Thursday night, right downtown. At the edge of the town is the vast Windmill Island Gardens where you can tour a replica of the 14th century Wayside Inn and see the antique Dutch carousel which features hand-carved and painted wooden horses. You can find all about downtown Holland here. The farmers market at the end of 8th Street is open on Wednesdays and Saturdays, and reflects the agricultural abundance in our region and ethnic diversity of our residents.

  • Microbreweries and distilleries

New HollandCoppercraftBig LakeMacatawa Ale. Our alluring breweries expertly cater to distinguishing palates and some serve options only found in West Michigan.

  • Parks and beaches

Paddleboarding. Sand castle building. Sunset viewing. Sun bathing. Lake Michigan beckons with each wave and calms the soul. Sneak away to one of our state or county parks to refresh your soul and spend time with those you love. The new playground at Holland State Park was funded by the MEDC’s Patroncity program. You can find the complete list of county parks to visit here.

The MEDA annual meeting will be content- and connection-rich. Once you are done learning, go ahead relax and explore. For more information about the Holland region, click here.

Authored by MEDA’s 2017 Annual Meeting Committee Chair: Jennifer Owens, President, Lakeshore Advantage

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Visit Michigan’s West Coast at the 2017 MEDA Annual Meeting

1497368704823-c0ng1pxsv8-d4339e1d3f562bfae411f84b92bf0e4fThis year’s annual MEDA conference will start with a bang and end just as strong.

Kicking off the event are Haworth’s CEO Franco Bianchi and Herman Miller’s CEO Brian Walker, both at the helm of separate world class office furniture manufacturing headquarters in the region.  They are speaking on finding better qualified employees, as well as an initiative they are co-leading to encourage employers to help local education systems understand employer needs in order to better prepare students for careers. Day two offers three excellent tours – a diverse range of unique developments on the lakeshore. These include:

Learn about the technology it takes to commercialize new specialty and bio-based chemicals, all while making them cost effective for the organizations manufacturing them. MSUBI has incorporated science, engineering, operational, and business expertise into their program to make them one of the top regional research and innovation resources, where commercialization is happening on the banks of Lake Macatawa in this facility that is also part of the Holland SmartZone.

West Michigan is known for our craft beer industry. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to tour one of our breweries and find learn about their impressive Brew on Site system which attributes to their industry’s success.

The Holland Energy Park is an international example of a municipal utility with a plan for the community’s future that includes baseline generation, beautifying the eastern gateway to downtown Holland and restoring wetlands. This brand new combined-cycled natural gas power plant is the only plant of its type to be built in the United States this year. Experience some of the latest energy production technology and how the Holland Board of Public Works is managing it. This tour has limited spots available; sign up soon.

The conference grand finale will include an exciting ignite session to provide ideas for you economic development strategy with key local, state and federal leaders. You will have the opportunity for one-on-one conversations to extend your network and gain valuable connections that will contribute to becoming a more effective economic development leader in your community.

To find out more details about the tours, read here. To register and find out more about the conference visit here.

Authored by MEDA’s 2017 Annual Meeting Committee Chair: Jennifer Owens, President, Lakeshore Advantage

Starting your own business? Don’t skip a structured business plan

Clickner, Amy

Amy Clickner, CEO of Lake Superior Community Partnership

If you were to ask me what question I get asked most often by people who are looking to start their own business it would undoubtedly be; “Do I really need a business plan?”  My response is simple, if you want to succeed, yes, you do need a business plan.  Just like you wouldn’t build a house without plans or bake a cake without a recipe, you need to have plan for what your new venture will look like and how it will be funded.

With all of that being said, there are no hard and fast rules of what a business plan has to be or what it has to look like.  We have several guides at the Lake Superior Partnership Office and one of our business development representatives would be happy to sit down with you and go through them and find one that suits your personal style.  There are several things that a business plan needs to have:

  • An overview of your company
  • How you plan to structure it (a sole proprietor, LLC, Incorporation?)
  • Financials and Projections
  • Market Analysis
  • Industry Analysis
  • Competition
  • Human Resources Plan
  • Marketing and Sales Strategy
  • Management Plan
  • Exit Strategy

Most people take a look at that list and are turned off by it.  What does it mean?  Where am I supposed to get this stuff from?  Believe it or not, most of it you already know.  You know what you want your company to be, how you want it to run, what your financial situation is and what the day to day operations are going to look like.  Getting those out of your head and down on paper is an enormous first step.  From there, experts at the LSCP or SBDC can help you with the research and financial projections and the final packaging if you need to submit your business plan to a lender for financing.

Having a business plan and financial projections prepared for a lender is one reason that it is necessary to create one, but you may think that if you’re self-financing you can skip the process all together.  I don’t recommend it.  One of the most beneficial part of the planning process is that it help you work out the kinks in your plan and refine your ideas and budget.  In some cases after going through the planning process, people find that their business won’t be profitable and decide not to move forward, other times, they refine their ideas, sometimes the plan is just  a confirmation of what they already knew and no adjustments need to be made (this is extremely rare).

Owning your own business will be one of the most difficult and rewarding things that you will ever do, don’t shortchange yourself at the beginning by neglecting to prepare a plan.

Authored by: Amy Clickner, CEcD, CFRM, the CEO of Lake Superior Community Partnership. Amy is the Vice President of the Michigan Economic Developers Association.

Go For It!

Raised HandsEver think about joining a MEDA committee or running for the Board? And your next thought is probably “What am I thinking? Stop me before I volunteer again!” That’s normal. Everybody has plenty of work to do already. But I’d recommend doing it anyway. There is a lot to be gained on a personal level as well as for the good of the organization.

I’m about to rotate off of 6 years on the MEDA Board of Directors, and I have no clue how many years on the Education Committee.

What did that time mean to me?

  • Working with people from all over the state, which was a real education in different perspectives and issues.
  • Broadening my network of professional contacts
  • Educating our membership on my organization’s economic development efforts
  • Influencing the direction of a statewide organization
  • Working with some amazingly talented people

What is really unique about volunteering for MEDA is the professional support and attention to detail. John & Cassandra do the overwhelming majority of the legwork when the meeting is over. You will not walk out of a MEDA Committee or Board meeting with a bigger laundry list of work to do! Can’t beat that!

Some of you may be thinking, if it’s so great, why is she rotating off the Board? A fair question! Organizations need fresh blood – new ideas, new thinking. So, if you are at all interested, my advice is “Go for it!”

Authored by: Peggy Black, Principal Account Manager, DTE Energy. Peggy Black spent six years on MEDA’s Board of Directors and two of those years as President.

MEDA Members: View MEDA’s Active Committees and email cjorae@medaweb.org to let her know where you want to participate!

Where Collaboration Shapes Success

AM14Photo (640x640)I don’t know about you but I’m enjoying my Michigan summer so far. Our state has so much to offer in both things to do and people to meet. That’s why I’m really getting excited about my trip to Boyne Mountain Resort this August 20 – 22 for the MEDA Annual Meeting.

This year I’ve had the pleasure and privilege to serve as the Annual Meeting Committee Chair. I know firsthand the caliber of expertise represented on that committee and their professional intent to offer an outstanding agenda for everyone.

In an effort to “reinvent” Michigan there has been a great deal of discussion and emphasis on regionalism, forming partnerships and working collaboratively within and across jurisdictions in an overall effort to streamline processes to increase efficiency and reduce costs. With this in mind, we themed this year’s meeting “Operation Sandbox: Where Collaboration Shapes Success.”

Over the course of the two day conference, we will tackle some of the difficult issues economic developers wrestle with while meeting the challenge of successfully forming practical and meaningful collaborations to “get their job done.” Along the way, we will hear of the success stories from communities who have taken action and formed some very unique partnerships to solve very unique problems. Hint: our list of economic development partners is broadening to include some nontraditional players.

I am also eager to hear our keynote speaker, Della Rucker, Principal at Wise Economy, who wrote The Local Economy Revolution, What’s Changed and How You Can Help. I read and thoroughly enjoyed her book. She speaks about a sea change in the way the world works today and how communities and economic developers may need to adjust their thinking on how they approach these changes. I expect some interesting recommendations.

So, as I said, I’m very excited this summer to be in Michigan and to be a part of the important work that is being done to keep Michigan moving forward. But, there is always more to learn, more interesting people to meet so I hope you will join me in August for the MEDA Annual Meeting.

See you in August!

Marsha

Marsha Madle, CBSP
Madle Consulting Services, LLC
Meridian Township EDC

A Message from MEDA’s 2014 President

ImageHappy New Year to all MEDA members and I want to wish you a prosperous new year in all your endeavors. 

2014 will be an interesting year and one which I feel can bring many opportunities to the State of Michigan. Whether you are a Spartan fan or not, winning the Rose Bowl for the 100th game is a nice win for in many regards for our state and I hope this good luck continues in other ways this year. 

Thank you for re-electing me to the Board of Directors; it is my pleasure to serve as your Chairman for this year. As we have in the past, MEDA listens to you, our members, when we develop new initiatives. I am excited to give you a sneak preview of that. 

A new website is in the final stages of completion and will have a new look along with easier navigation. It will include online payments for all of our events.

Along with a new website comes with it new branding and marketing plan that we will be pushing in order to grow the Certified Business Park program, a valuable resource for business attraction. 

One of the valuable resources any association can provide is training. Look for new National Development Council (NDC) Courses as well as Courses from International Economic Development Council (IEDC) throughout this year. 

Last year we started a Young Professionals group and they continue to plan and execute ideas and events for the year. One of those planned will be Get Hired for a Day, a pilot program which will mentor young professionals in the field of economic development, giving them actual on the job experience. In a few months, they will also host an education and networking opportunity. 

Our annual meeting will be held at Boyne Mountain Resort from August 20-22nd. This years theme will be Operation Sandbox: Where Collaboration Shapes Success. The committee is hard at work on the content and you will be seeing information come out in a few months about our annual event. 

We plan on having an active year and I urge you to become involved. I am fortunate to work with a great group of Board members; many of them are new and eager to lend a hand. Our staff which includes John Avery and Cassandra is some of the finest professionals in the association world and we are looking forward to developing new programs and listening to you, our membership. Please do not hesitate in contacting myself or other members on the Board if we can be of assistance to you in role of economic development. 

Thank you and cheers to 2014!

Best Regards,

Ara Topouzian, 2014 MEDA President
President and Chief Executive Officer, Troy Chamber of Commerce

Future for Self-Driving Cars in Michigan

The auto industry is on the verge of revolutionary change with the potential to dramatically reshape the way we interact with vehicles and the future design of our roads and cities (KPMG White Paper on Self Driving Cars). The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute (UMTRI) is leading the charge with breakthrough research that will transform the future of mobility. The Connected Vehicle Safety Pilot Program is a scientific research initiative that features real-world implementation of connected vehicle safety technologies, applications, and systems using everyday drivers.

The inclusion of the Ann Arbor region in this study, with real people driving real cars, will accelerate the learning cycles of drivers, thereby driving near term market acceptance and raising the stature of the State of Michigan in the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Automotive World. The proposed Center for ITS and Autonomous Vehicles will establish Southeast Michigan as the world leader in driving technology and standards through industry and regulatory collaboration.

The State of Michigan needs to leverage UMTRI’s dominant research and development success in this space and “control” industry collaboration, thereby attracting more private sector investment. Creating imminent value to the industry will leverage significant investment from OEMs and technology suppliers which should be captured in the Southeast Michigan region. As a leader in this field, the State of Michigan stands to gain from new private research dollars and a pipeline of federal funding geared towards the ITS industry. A need still remains for building the road testing and simulation infrastructure to spur an entrepreneurial environment around the ITS industry. Construction of a world class test facility at the RACER property, a significant asset straddling Washtenaw and Wayne County, will set Michigan apart from growing competition to capture ITS as an economic development catalyst.

A Public/Private sector partnership has been formed to redevelop the RACER site into a connected vehicle test center. Detroit based Walbridge, Ann Arbor SPARK, The Center for Automotive Research, Ypsilanti Township, The Detroit Aerotropolis, RACER Trust, and Willow Run Airport (Detroit Metro Airport Authority) are pooling their assets together to assist in the largest redevelopment project ever, taking the 5 million square foot Former GM Powertrain facility (the plant was owned by Ford as well and was at one point the B-24 Bomber plant) and turning into a multi-faceted connected and autonomous test center, complete with leasable flex/R&D space, garages, incubator, “office hoteling” space, and a testing environment specifically designed to test variable driving conditions that can improve connected vehicle technology. There will be no site as comprehensive anywhere in the world. And it’s in the best location, Southeast Michigan.

Economic developers are in key positions to make projects like this happen. We are a trusted third party to business, academia, and government. No matter what region, there are valuable assets to take advantage of. Our ability To convene stakeholders representing those assets is exactly what makes our work so important to the economic health of our community.

We should constantly challenge ourselves to be leaders, listen to our stakeholders, and creatively connect the disparate dots in our economic regions making opportunities that can create jobs and investment.

Authored by: Luke Bonner, Vice President of Business Development, Ann Arbor SPARK. Luke serves as a Member at Large on MEDA’s Board of Directors

What are the New Faces of Economic Development?

The theme for MEDA’s 2013 Annual Meeting, to be held in Grand Rapids, will be The New Face of Economic Development. I hope you agree that this is an intriguing title as it wasn’t made lightly when the committee discussed it many months ago. The committee concluded that so much has changed in the Great Lakes State, that this was the logical title and theme for the meeting. As we come out of the economic slump, I feel much has changed in the realm of economic development and it is important to address those changes within our profession while continuing to investigate new approaches to economic development. Let me provide you a sneak preview of the types of sessions which make up our theme this year. We will discuss what the role of the economic developer is and how it has changed – what is expected of them and how have the resources been changed; a session will include a team of international speakers who will cover the global outreach that we face for business attraction; discussions will also cover crowd funding and regionalism.

Change in economic development seems to continue almost on a daily basis, but for starters, I do believe Michigan Governor Rick Snyder and Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC) President Michael Finney have offered a refreshing change on the approach to business attraction and retention. Whether you are a fan or not, the incentive structure has been altered and I don’t know that I have seen much fall out from this change in direction. Secondly, regional partnership has been embraced by utilizing strengths from several of our private economic development agencies across the state. Organizations such as Detroit Regional Chamber, The Right Place, and Southwest Michigan First are just a few strong organizations that are helping assist the MEDC with this regional “touch” by providing their strong areas to the overall Pure Michigan efforts.

Next are the Young Professionals, a relatively new group within MEDA that will help identify, mention and education up and coming economic development professionals in providing them the network and tools that will help them grow in their respective roles. A kickoff reception will be held at the Annual Meeting and if you are 40 and under, you are welcome to attend.

Register today for the MEDA Annual Meeting and I look forward to seeing you at the Amway Grand on August 21st!

Recently I transitioned into the new position of President/CEO for the Troy Chamber of Commerce from being the Economic Development Director for the City of Novi for the past six years. I was fortunate to have worked with some fine people and businesses in Novi and now as I am in Troy, my past background and experience will hopefully benefit the Troy Chamber and business community. Chambers can be vital in economic development by helping educate businesses on how to network effectively and create relationships that are mutually beneficial. They can also assist in being an arm to their marketing department. Helping get the word out there about how strong of a company they are so that the bottom line is positively affected.

Finally, speaking of a new face for economic development, the Troy Transit Center is currently under construction with a planned completion and opening in September. This will be a 2,400 square foot facility equipped with restrooms, commercial concessions, pedestrian bridge and over a hundred parking spots. The Troy Chamber was an advocate for this project and felt that it can be an added boost for local economic growth. Amtrack and SMART would utilize this center and in many cases can be a great welcome for patrons to our city.

Authored by: Ara Topouzian, President/CEO of Troy Chamber of Commerce. Ara serves as Vice President of MEDA.

Talent Development for Economic Developers

As Michigan’s robust economic recovery continues to set the pace for the nation, our client companies are all bringing their talent issues forward.  The challenge is so great that Governor Rick Snyder’s recent Economic Summit quickly turned into a talent development discussion.  Across Michigan economic development organizations and their partners are working tirelessly to address this barrier to growth.  All of this attention focused on the talent needs of our clients begs the question:  what are we doing to grow the talent pool within the economic development profession?

Being an economic developer is an extraordinarily rewarding career opportunity.  We have the ability to migrate between private and public sector domains, impacting corporate decisions as well as public policy.  We can draw energy from the upstart entrepreneurs we assist.  We are leaders in our community, helping to shape the vision of our region and towns for generations to come.  And we can drive by projects and take great pride in knowing we had an impact on the lives of those people who parked their cars in that company lot that day.

All the research shows that the younger generation today is seeking out significance.  They want to belong to a team that is making an impact.  Beyond making widgets or drafting code, the next generation wants to feel a part of something that is changing the world.  Why do you think Google encourages staffers to take time off to volunteer?  The economic development profession offers significance.  This is incredibly rewarding work.  So how can we attract and retain more of the best and brightest to work alongside us?  Here are some of my experiences that may prove useful to you:

  • Internships:  My career started as an intern at Greater Gratiot Development, Inc.  In a ‘pay it forward’ kind of way, I have run an internship program at Lakeshore Advantage.  Though the interns have not stuck within economic development, they have made a strong contribution to the success of our organization.  We just interviewed 4 outstanding candidates for this summer and will be adding two to the team—a very cost effective way to bring new talent and new ideas into the organization.
  • Mentorship:  My career has been filled with great mentors.  At each stop, people have generously given of their time and talent to help me develop my career.  Too many to list.  Who are you mentoring today?  MEDA has launched a new Young Professionals Group that is seeking out mentors—sign up with Cassandra today!
  • Flexibility:  Our team at Lakeshore Advantage is outstanding.  We have been able to hire great talent, largely out of industry.  To be honest, our compensation package is average.  We make up for this by offering a flexible work environment.
  • Leadership:  Our team is also active in the community, taking leadership roles on a variety of initiatives.  This reinforces their importance to the team and the community, gives them a development opportunity and helps expand their network.  All of this is beneficial to the organization too!
  • Training:  We can all utilize MEDA even more than we already do.  As Chair of MEDA’s Education Committee, I am always open to new ideas for programming.  We have two great upcoming programs to put on your calendar (and bring someone from your staff!):  the Toolbox program on May 30th is a great look into the details of the myriad of programs we all utilize; in November, we are going to ask each of you to put yourselves in the shoes of your client—we will be offering manufacturing-type training, including lean, Six Sigma and corporate innovation training.  Let’s learn what our clients are learning.

Economic development is highly rewarding work.  We can drive through our communities and see the impact we make.  Economic development is a natural for anyone seeking significance in their career.  This list above is just a start.  In the comments below, add your own best practice to the list.  What are you doing within your organization to attract and retain the best in the economic development profession?

Authored by Randy Thelen, President, Lakeshore Advantage Corporation

Thelen serves as a Treasurer on the Michigan Economic Developers Association Board of Directors.