Energy Opportunities in Michigan

alternative-alternative-energy-clean-356049Every so often, there is a change in government policy that creates opportunities for jobs and new investment in our communities. One of our roles in economic development is to help our local government leaders learn about these opportunities and educate themselves as much as possible to make informed decisions. We have one such opportunity in front of us today.

The state of Michigan established a Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS), requiring that the state’s 84 electric providers in Michigan secure 10% of their energy from renewable sources by 2015. In 2016, the State of Michigan increased its renewable portfolio standards to 15% by 2021.

In addition, last month, Consumers Energy announced it had filed a plan with the MPSC that outlined a path to using zero coal, while ensuring affordable and reliable energy for Michigan families and businesses. Under the plan, the company would increase renewable energy from 11% today to 37% by 2030. The company has a goal of reducing its carbon emissions and eliminating the use of coal to generate electricity by 2040. The company proposes to add 550 MW of wind to help them reach Michigan’s goal of 15% by 2021. They also expect to add 5,000 MW of solar energy with ramp-up throughout the 2020’s.

DTE Energy is also planning to reduce its carbon footprint and incorporate substantially more renewable and cleaner sources of energy into its generation mix. In 2017, DTE announced a broad sustainability initiative to reduce the company’s carbon emissions by more than 80 percent while continuing to provide reliable and affordable power to its 2.2 million customers. DTE will achieve this reduction by incorporating substantially more renewable energy, eliminating coal, using low emission natural gas, continuing to operate its zero-emission Fermi 2 nuclear power plant, and improving options for customers to save energy and reduce bills. Recently, DTE filed plans to double its renewable energy capacity by 2022, adding another 1,000 MW of wind and solar and driving investment of more than $1.7 billion in Michigan’s energy sector.

What can we do to help our communities become prepared for renewable energy?

During the initial RPS period, a majority of wind-generated projects were developed in areas such as Michigan’s Thumb and Gratiot County among others. With the increase in the RPS and the recently released goals of our largest utilities, we anticipate that there may be an opportunity for additional wind and solar projects.

In our area, developers are already contacting landowners to secure sites for solar and wind projects. Local government officials are considering amendments to their master plans to address renewable energy production. They are also looking at developing zoning ordinances that align with the community’s plan for renewable energy production.

As economic developers, we may want to assist our local government officials by providing educational opportunities related to solar and wind energy. MSU Extension recently provided an excellent workshop called, “Shining a Light on Agricultural Solar Energy Development”, which provided great information for property owners considering solar development.

Webinars

Collaborating with MSU Extension and local government associations to develop a similar workshop on wind energy would be of great benefit to our local government officials trying to address these opportunities and challenges; some for the first time. Potential topics could include an overview of the industry and siting wind turbines and their operational characteristics. You may also want to invite an official from one of the Thumb or Gratiot Communities to share their experience with wind development. As the local economic developer, you may want to prepare an economic impact analysis to show the property tax increase provided by a wind energy project.

At the end of the day, it is a local government decision and our role is to ensure that these public officials are able to make well-informed decisions for the economic betterment of their communities.

Authored by: JoAnn Crary, CEcD, President, Saginaw Future, Inc. JoAnn is a long-time member of MEDA and our 2018 Committee Chair.

NOTE: For more information on the webinars mentioned, you can contact M. Charles Gould, Agricultural Bioenergy and Energy Conservation Educator, Michigan State University Extension, PH: 616-994-4547, gouldm@anr.msu.edu.

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public policy (noun): government policies that affect the whole population

Public policy is not something everyone thinks about but is very important in how our society is managed. The Center for Civic Education defines specific attributes of public policy that help to expand on the above basic definition:

  • Policy is made in response to some sort of issue or problem that requires attention. Policy is what the government chooses to do (actual) or not do (implied) about a particular issue or problem.
  • Policy might take the form of law, or regulation, or the set of all the laws and regulations that govern a particular issue or problem.
  • Policy is made on behalf of the “public.”
  • Policy is oriented toward a goal or desired state, such as the solution of a problem.
  • Policy is ultimately made by governments, even if the ideas come from outside government or through the interaction of government and the public.
  • Policymaking is part of an ongoing process that does not always have a clear beginning or end, since decisions about who will benefit from policies and who will bear any burden resulting from the policy are continually reassessed, revisited and revised.

You can clearly see that a key ingredient for good public policy is the “public” part. That is you and me. When we vote, we are making a choice of individuals we trust to work through the policy process, often referred to as sausage making, with our best interests in mind.

But there are additional ways we can participate. When there is a problem or issue that needs to be addressed, do you reach out to policy makers and let them know how you feel? What you believe is the right thing to do? Do you send a letter/note, make a call or attend a town hall meeting to share your support or opposition?

These are a variety of ways that you can communicate effectively with those in positions to shape public policy, and they want to hear from you. This is why the Marquette County Ambassadors have focused, for decades, on building strong relationships with our elected officials and engaging in policy creation and debate of issues affecting our community.

The Marquette County Ambassadors are a privately funded group of business, education, community and government leaders from across Marquette County whose mission it is to “promote and foster economic vitality throughout Marquette County and the Upper Peninsula, to carry the story of the Marquette County area to others, and salute those who deserve recognition.”

For decades the Marquette County Ambassadors have made trips to Lansing to meet with legislators and state department personnel. The purpose of the trip is threefold: to inform our legislators of relevant issues affecting Marquette County and the Upper Peninsula, to hear their perspectives on activities related to state government, and to share with them our position on critical issues related to the Upper Peninsula. This year we were proud to have partners from Baraga and Dickinson counties join us.

The Ambassadors researched and produced position papers in four major areas:

  • Economic Development
  • Education
  • Local Government
  • Infrastructure

Many, if not all, of the issues raised or initiatives supported are not specific to Marquette County, but rather the Upper Peninsula as a whole. Regional cooperation continues to play a vital role in the betterment of the Upper Peninsula and U.P. communities have a long history of working together. Our legislators appreciate the regional collaboration and single voice on issues they are pursuing.

So at the end of the day, if we want public policy to truly address the needs and concerns of the public, then we “the public” need to engage. For issues and legislation we are watching, hop on to our website at www.marquette.org.

Authored By: Amy Clickner, CEcD, CFRM, Chief Executive Officer, Lake Superior Community Partnership. Amy is a Member at Large on MEDA’s Board of Directors.

 

Don’t be an Average Economic Developer, be a MEDA Member!

As community leaders, we are asked to be members of many different groups – professional organizations, fraternal orders, chambers of commerce and more. Each of these groups brings different benefits. Some provide networking opportunities, discounts, others provide easy access to a wide array of knowledge that would otherwise require hours of research.

726015D4-DEF2-43FE-80F3-8BD081DBCE4AThe Michigan Economic Developers Association (MEDA) provides all of this, and more! MEDA hosts three annual training seminars that keep Economic Development professionals at the top of their game. The Spring and Fall Toolbox seminars are excellent opportunities to learn about what is going on across the state and nation in economic development. Experts in different areas of practice lead deep dives and robust discussions of the subject matter to ensure that participants go back to their home community with knowledge that can be implemented right away.

MEDA’s Annual Meeting is two and a half days of knowledge and networking bliss.  Nationally relevant speakers, topics that have been vetted by members, and free evenings for meeting with colleagues from around the region are just a few of the many reasons that attending the Annual Meeting is an absolute must. Additionally, these events provide continuing education credits for nationally-recognized certifications from as The National Development Council (NDC) and The International Economic DeveNew Members 1lopment Council (IEDC).

Of course you do not have to be a member of MEDA to participate, but if you are planning on attending each event, then your membership discount would cover the cost of joining! Additionally, you would get the members’ only benefit of being able to anonymously (or not) poll fellow members about any topic in municipal management/economic development to help move your community forward. This is only the tip of the iceberg; check out www.medaweb.org for more awesome events and benefits.

Still not convinced of the benefits of membership? Consider this – MEDA is currently in the process of offering all of the courses needed to obtain the Certified Economic Developer (CEcD) certification through the IEDC. Courses are normally held in Lansing and MEDA members get a discount – convenient and economical!

If you’re not currently taking advantage of MEDA benefits, then take a second look, grab your discounts, get connected with colleagues, and use MEDA to help research your next project.

Authored by MEDA 2017 Board Secretary Khalfani Stephens, CEcD, EDFP, Director of Economic Development, City of Farmington Hills.

Visit Michigan’s West Coast at the 2017 MEDA Annual Meeting

1497368704823-c0ng1pxsv8-d4339e1d3f562bfae411f84b92bf0e4fThis year’s annual MEDA conference will start with a bang and end just as strong.

Kicking off the event are Haworth’s CEO Franco Bianchi and Herman Miller’s CEO Brian Walker, both at the helm of separate world class office furniture manufacturing headquarters in the region.  They are speaking on finding better qualified employees, as well as an initiative they are co-leading to encourage employers to help local education systems understand employer needs in order to better prepare students for careers. Day two offers three excellent tours – a diverse range of unique developments on the lakeshore. These include:

Learn about the technology it takes to commercialize new specialty and bio-based chemicals, all while making them cost effective for the organizations manufacturing them. MSUBI has incorporated science, engineering, operational, and business expertise into their program to make them one of the top regional research and innovation resources, where commercialization is happening on the banks of Lake Macatawa in this facility that is also part of the Holland SmartZone.

West Michigan is known for our craft beer industry. Don’t miss out on the opportunity to tour one of our breweries and find learn about their impressive Brew on Site system which attributes to their industry’s success.

The Holland Energy Park is an international example of a municipal utility with a plan for the community’s future that includes baseline generation, beautifying the eastern gateway to downtown Holland and restoring wetlands. This brand new combined-cycled natural gas power plant is the only plant of its type to be built in the United States this year. Experience some of the latest energy production technology and how the Holland Board of Public Works is managing it. This tour has limited spots available; sign up soon.

The conference grand finale will include an exciting ignite session to provide ideas for you economic development strategy with key local, state and federal leaders. You will have the opportunity for one-on-one conversations to extend your network and gain valuable connections that will contribute to becoming a more effective economic development leader in your community.

To find out more details about the tours, read here. To register and find out more about the conference visit here.

Authored by MEDA’s 2017 Annual Meeting Committee Chair: Jennifer Owens, President, Lakeshore Advantage

The Spring Toolbox, Tuesday, May 16th – A Look Ahead

17 Spring Toolbox Postcard for RoblyIn economic development sharing best practices and growing good relationships is imperative to being successful. I have enjoyed volunteering on the Education Committee to develop The Spring Economic Development Toolbox and co-chairing this year with Kimberly Marrone, Economic Development and Communications Director, City of Oak Park.

Some of the topics that will be covered:

  • Understanding the Implications of Federal Foreign Policy Changes

What will it mean for trade in a major manufacturing state? How will it impact our state’s relationships with foreign companies? Will the dynamics of foreign workers shift? And what will the impact be on our university’s admissions of international students and the local economies of communities they reside in?

  • Opportunity for All: Strategies for Inclusive Economic Development

Although residents in many communities are thriving, there are those who are experiencing declining incomes, low or no participation in the labor force, and living in increasingly concentrated poverty. Expanding economic opportunity for these residents impacts a region’s ability to grow its economy and be the best it can be. A review of a paper presented at IEDC explores the issue of economic opportunity from a developer’s perspective, and highlights best practices from nine case studies.

  • Streamlining the Development Process: Applying One Stop Ready Principles in Local Communities

One Stop Ready is Oakland County’s economic development program to provide local communities with the resources, tools and trainings needed to capitalize on local strengths, improve processes, and make its vision a reality. A review of best practices and of the Benchmark Self-Evaluation Tool.

  • Educational Attainment as an Economic Driver for States, Regions, and Communities

How the result of this co-learning project is making an impact and why economic developers should pay close attention to credentials.

Visit www.medaweb.org/springtoolbox to view the full agenda and to register.

Author: Maria Nevai, Michigan Economic Developers Association Education Committee Co-Chair, Vice President, The Opportunity Group Alliance – Capitol Area Opportunity Group and Principal/Consultant, Maria Nevai, LLC 

Educational Attainment Delivers Economic Returns

ImageIt has become known that education is the most important engine of economic growth and individual financial gain. There is little doubt that our success in growing a stronger economy and lifting incomes will depend on getting better results in education, from cradle to career.

Helping to address the regional goal of 60% educational attainment by 2025, I have the privilege of working with leaders at all levels in the education, nonprofit, community, civic, and philanthropic sectors to tackle some of the most pressing challenges and take advantage of some of our biggest opportunities. There are a variety of programs that track outcome indicators across the cradle to career spectrum with the ultimate goal of higher educational attainment at all levels.

Because this is such an important element in the future of our region, together we have evaluated the latest educational attainment data for our region, looking at both local progress and how we compare to other peer areas. Specifically, there is a clear positive relationship with median earnings and an inverse relationship with the unemployment rate at a national level.

Educational Attainment in the Urban Core

With the release of the American Community Survey (ACS) 2005-2009 5-Year estimates, Educational Attainment data are available for smaller geographies for the first time outside of the decennial censuses. The data are based on a rolling annual sample survey mailed to about 3 million addresses between Jan. 1, 2005, and Dec. 31, 2009. By pooling several years of survey responses, the ACS can generate detailed statistical portraits of smaller geographies. The Census Bureau will release a new set of 5-year estimates every year, giving communities a powerful tool to track local trends over time. In the urban core, the low hanging fruit is educational attainment for the 25-35 age group that has some college and the City of Grand Rapids knows that supporting the completion of a certificate program or a college degree in this age bracket will produce quick and meaningful results.

Educational Attainment in the Region

Educational Attainment is a key indicator for our region as a whole. Educational Attainment data from can be found for the entire Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), as well as by county, in the new census data portal. Data are provided on Percent of the Population 25 and Older with an Associate’s Degree or Higher, along with other indicators.

There is, of course, data to show multiple levels of attainment. MSA and peer region data related to the Percent of the Population 25 and Older with Bachelor’s Degree or Higher is something economic developers should evaluate and consider when determining what work still needs to be done.  

The data can also be broken out by other levels of attainment and by age. It is important to look at all the data and help ensure that our region is moving up at all levels. The data can also be broken out by age and this is where we see some positive movement for your region.

I challenge you to compare your city, county, village, township, region to others in the state and peers outside the state to determine how competitive you are now and what work is needed to make you more competitive in the future. The future of our state is our talent and if we don’t have a talented workforce we can’t attract the economic activity.

Authored by: Kara Wood, Economic Development Director, City of Grand Rapids. Kara serves as Treasurer on MEDA’s Board of Directors.