New MEDA President Encourages Engagement to Build Even Stronger Association

horvath, justin sedpFellow MEDA Members,

I am honored to serve as your Board President for 2019! This promises to be an exciting year, as we continue to focus on providing quality education, networking and advocacy opportunities.

The strength of our efforts is made possible by the engagement of you, our members. Even though we are all certainly busy in our daily work aiding Michigan’s economic growth, I’m asking you for one simple thing this year: get involved in just one extra activity that will advance the success of our organization.

There are so many different ways to accomplish this:

  • Attend an education and networking event (there are several throughout the year, including our Annual Meeting in Marquette)
  • Join a working Committee (lots to choose from: Advocacy, Membership, Annual Meeting, Emerging Leaders, Certified Business Parks, and Education)
  • Participate in a special real estate or finance training program offered in partnership with the International Economic Development Council and National Development Council
  • Refer a new member
  • Encourage someone to join our profession by being part of Get Hired for a Day
  • Share best practices by replying to a member’s request for information through our mass emailing system
  • Post an available economic development job
  • Share our news stories through your social media channels
  • Keep your state legislators informed on important issues

By taking any of these actions, you not only further your own professional development, but you also help to strengthen MEDA as the leading voice for economic developers in Michigan.

Let’s make 2019 our best year ever!

Best,

Justin Horvath, CEcD
2019 MEDA Board President
President and Chief Executive Officer
Shiawassee Economic Development Partnership

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Strategic Plan Still Sitting on the Shelf?

NLEA Team took part in Strategic Doing Workshop hosted by MSU Extension which taught the practice of collaborative leadership to move action items forward.

Like many organizational planning sessions, a group is hired to come in and help write a strategic plan and after hours of work the question still remains, “how do we implement this?” Oftentimes a plan either doesn’t have a sense of purpose, or it wasn’t specific enough for anyone to carry out.

To add to this lack of purpose, meetings are often ineffective: 73 percent of employees do other work in meetings and 75 percent of individuals have no formal training to run a meeting.

The problem is that our meetings and collaborative groups today are no longer hierarchical, chain-of-command type settings, and often there is nothing in place to make sure group members are accountable for work they do or don’t do. “Instead of our old habits of command and control, we have to figure out how to align and activate a network of people and organizations;” this is the concept behind Strategic Doing.

At its root, Strategic Doing can propel a small, focused group to bring something to the table and each have a role in making a project happen. With 10 simple rules, your meetings and plans can be transformed:

  1. Create and maintain a safe space for deep, focused conversations. Identify the core group of 6 action oriented individuals and meet in a space that will foster discussion.
  2. Frame conversation around appreciative question. Positive problem solving. Imagine if your community could be X? What would that look like?
  3. Uncover hidden assets among the group. Have everyone share what they bring to the table, strengths, connections, and project ideas.
  4. Link and leverage your assets to create new opportunities. You may notice aligned interests or project ideas forming, or discover contacts that could help make projects possible. Combine the group assets and you can move a project forward easier.
  5. Rank all your opportunities to find your “Big Easy.” This is the idea which will impact the most people in your community, and is relatively easy to implement. Rank the ease and impact of the projects on your list. First, each person evaluates the potential impact if it were completely successful with 5 being high and 1 being low. Next, each person evaluates how easy or difficult it would be with 5 being easy and 1 being difficult. Add everyone’s numbers then total impact and ease scores to find your “Big Easy.”
  6. Convert your “Big Easy” into an outcome with measurable characteristics. What would people see, how would they feel, and how would their lives be different?
  7. Define at least one Pathfinder Project with guideposts. This is your pilot project to help you test some assumptions that could be completed within approximately 3 to 6 months. (Could be phase one of your project to create an initial buzz)
  8. Draft an action plan with everyone taking a small step. What will each member in the group do in the next 30 days? Everyone must contribute at least an hour of their time to a part of the project, and document their contribution to the group.
  9. Set a 30/30 meeting to review progress. What has been done in the last 30 days, and what needs to happen in the next 30?
  10. Nudge, connect, and promote relentlessly to build your new habits of collaboration. Keep each other accountable and get to work.

Authored By: Andy Hayes, President, Northern Lakes Economic Alliance. Andy is a long-time member of MEDA.

Happy New Year: Make Habits Not Resolutions!

As we usher in another year, the prevailing conversation around the water cooler centers around our resolutions for 2018. We also know that most of those resolutions (diet, exercise, read more, etc.) rarely make it past the first quarter. That’s why we need to focus on making better habits and not just making resolutions.

It is safe to say that most successful people have certain habits in common. There is a great debate about what exactly those habits are, or what combination of habits guarantee success. But I think it boils down to committing to master those habits in areas that you have weaknesses.

I have read many self-help books and taken countless professional/personal development courses throughout my life. While there have been great nuggets of advice that I have taken from those courses, the one course that has helped me navigate my day to day and realize some personal goals is Steven Covey’s “7 Habits of Highly Effective People”.

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Covey breaks down 7 habits that maximizes your time, effort and energy and encourages you to not only be a more effective leader, but also an effective follower. Trying to wholeheartedly incorporate all 7 habits on day one is not realistic, so again I reiterate working on those habits where you feel you may have some weaknesses first.

So, for this New Year, I am reinforcing Habit 2, “Begin with the end in mind”. I am going to take the time to meditate on my goals, create my vision board and tweak my personal mission statement. Having a resolution of dropping a few pounds, or eating healthier is great, but if you commit to maintaining the habit of a healthy lifestyle your success can be found in your living.

Authored by 2018 MEDA Board President Monique Holliday-Bettie, EDFP, Economic Development Manager, DTE Energy, Economic Development